Frisco’s National Videogame Museum is Gaming Nostalgia

Frisco’s National Videogame Museum is Gaming Nostalgia


A new museum offering a glimpse
into the old days
of video games.
Welcome to the National
Videogame Museum.
Here’s co-founder, John Hardy.
– How are ya?
– I’m doing great, I feel like
I’ve stepped back
into my childhood.
– We’re gonna take you back,
believe me.
(Chet laughs)
It’ll be great.
– Opened in 2016, this
museum will take you
back to 8-bit and before.
It’s part video game experience,
part video game history,
all video game nerdom.
You know, I know of a
lot of these consoles.
I’ve played on a lot
of these consoles
but some of these I have
never seen in my life.
– Well let me show
this piece right here.
This is really cool.
It’s called a brown box.
It’s the first
video game console,
it was designed by Ralph Baer
and this is basically just Pong
and it cant’ do anything
more than play Pong.
It’s the first console.
Now, it’s not an original.
The original is
in the Smithsonian
but he hand build that
for us to display here.
– Pong started a revolution
and if you’ve never played,
well this museum has the largest
Pong player in the world.
Oh you’re gonna
smoke me in this.
– Ah, I don’t know.
Steering wheel
– Whoa.
sized controllers.
There’s a learning curve.
– Just warming up.
I’m just warming up.
– That’s a warm up.
– There’s a learning curve.
– Oh!
– [John] Once you get
the feel, you’re alright.
– There it is.
Pong blew open the flood gates
and things started
progressing quickly.
– We show 50 consoles
up on the wall
and these controllers,
these giant controllers,
actually do work
and you can find out
anything you wanted about
these particular consoles.
– I’ve never seen a
Vectrex in my life.
– Yeah, there’s a
lot of great systems
that people don’t really
have a lot of exposure with.
Stuff like an Adventure Vision
which is a pretty rare console
but not that many people
ever saw it back in the day,
you know.
– No.
– [Chet] Down the
digital rabbit hole we go
to consoles, controllers and
games I never knew existed.
– Familiar with House
of the Dead from Sega
where you shoot the zombies.
– Yes, uh-huh.
So Typing of the Dead kind
of made it educational.
You have to type the word
above the zombie to kill it.
– Samba, buyer,
Wait, I might actually
– You’re not doing too bad.
be alright, water
– You’re on to something.
(Chet laughs)
– [Cameraman] Stay
on the home row.
– There it is, there
it is, stay on (laughs)
this is ridiculous.
See Mom, killing
zombies is educational.
If only I’d known that
when I was growing up.
Speaking of young
Chet, well this bedroom
looks all too similar
to one I used to know.
Boop, boop, boop,
boop, boop, boop, boop,
Boop, boop, boo
– Were you good at Simon?
I was pretty good at Simon.
Pretty good at Simon.
– How far did you get?
Oh, I only got to like 852.
So yeah, 852.
– You know how I know
this is his bedroom,
Depeche Mode, on the
wall, right there.
(Chet laughs)
D&D and a Trapper Keeper, I
totally had a Trapper Keeper.
Empire Strikes
Back, oh absolutely.
This was how many
years of my life,
Mom, I’ll be down for
dinner in a little bit,
one more game.
– God, leave me alone.
I don’t need to come
down for dinner yet.
I’m not even hungry.
Bam.
– [Cameraman] I
especially like how
you’re a foot away
from the screen.
– Oh, you want to see this?
You wanna, what?
You wanna see, alright.
Oh!
Cap, cap, cap.
More than just
nostalgia overload,
this museum does
an excellent job
telling the history of
the gaming industry.
Including the dark days of 1983,
when the industry almost crashed
under a tidal wave
of terrible games.
– You had companies
that had no business
making games getting involved.
So you have Quaker Oats had a
video game division, right.
(Chet laughs)
And Ralston Purina put out a
Chase the Chuckwagon dog food
for the Atari and
Johnson & Johnson
did a tooth protectors game.
So just anybody and their
brother was making games
and most them were
really pretty bad.
– Kids got upset, parents
got sick of wasting money
and people just
stopped buying games.
And what is considered
the worst game ever made,
you can play right here.
(John laughs)
The infamous Pit, alright
let’s try it on this side.
(Chet laughs)
Man I love this movie but
this game is terrible.
How am I supposed to get
away from that dude? (laughs)
What?
The museum is packed with
the coolest and rarest stuff.
These two games are worth
well over $10,000 each
but it isn’t just
looking backwards.
Oh whoa, here we go.
(imitating tires screeching)
Argh, I’m about to throw
up breakfast though
on this race track.
Argh.
But we haven’t even touched
perhaps the best
part of this museum.
Oh you want a blast to the past?
Here you go.
A full token arcade.
Now this takes me back..
♪ I think I’ve seen you before
♪ Down at the Troubadour

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