Letter Jam – Tutorial

Letter Jam – Tutorial


Hi welcome to Dibs On Blue!
My name is Stephanie and this is my sign name.
Today I want to show how to play this game,
Letter Jam.
Thank you to Czech Games Edition for sponsoring
this video.
You can play with 2 to 6 players and the play
time is around 30 to 60 minutes.
The goal of the game is that all players work
together, providing word clues to help players
guess their own personal words.
At the end of the game, you want the most
players able to successfully guess their word.
To set up and start the game, put down the number tokens and the wild card in the center of the table.
All players need a pencil, which the game
already has included.
Everyone needs a guessing sheet as well, which
should be folded in half to prevent
other players from peaking at the paper.
Also put down the set up card in the center
of the table that corresponds to the number of players.
Place the appropriate amount of red and green
tokens on the spaces of the card, seen here.
Shuffle the letter cards and deal an equal
amount, face down, to each player.
But do you see this in the corner of the card?
That means, in this 4 player game, there are
2 non players.
They’re just dummy players, not actual players.
You should always use the 6 stands provided
in the game no matter the number of players.
So in this example, one of the dummy players
gets 7 cards and the other dummy player gets 8,
as you can see here on the table.
Under each of those card stacks, you place
one of the green tokens.
I’ll explain why a little later.
Each player needs to guess a secret word,
so let’s take a look at how those words are created.
Well, you could use the app for the game,
or the players can come up with the words
by deciding how long the words should be,
should they stick to short words, go for long words,
exactly how many letters, etc.
Maybe players decide to go for 4 letter words.
So for that example, I look at my letter cards
dealt to me and create any 4 letter word I choose.
Let’s say I go with Bowl.
I shuffle the 4 letters, B, O, W, L and pass
them to the player on my right.
I get 4 letter cards from the player to my left.
I won’t look at those cards because that’s
my secret word.
The cards the players have left, that weren’t
used to create a secret word, are discarded
in a stack face down to the center of the table.
Now players take their 4 cards, lay them out
like this,
and place the first card in the stand in front of them.
I’ve already done that for the others here.
Players can see my card, but I can’t.
And I can see everyone else’s cards.
At the same time, everyone looks at the letters
they can see.
When you look at the letters, you try to think
of a word they can spell, perhaps using
as many letters as possible.
Players can use one letter as many times as
they want.
And as a player, you should always see at
least 5 letters.
You can use the wild card to represent any
1 letter, not many different letters for one word.
Then players discuss their word.
How many letters are in the word?
Are player’s letters used?
Is the wild card used?
Are the dummy player letters used?
Only basic information like that.
Players should never say the actual letters
themselves.
So you have to be careful.
The rule book outlines specific legal and
illegal clues.
For example, a player might be like, “I
can create a word with 4 letters that uses
3 player letters and the wild card.”
Maybe they’re thinking of the word BOAR
with the wild card representing B.
Another player might say, “Well I can create a 3 letter
word that uses 3 player letters and that’s it.”
Maybe they’re thinking RAW.
And so on.
Then, players decide who to go with.
Who should be the ultimate clue giver, helping
us the most?
Maybe players decide to go with the 3 letter word that uses only 3 player letters because they
don’t want that wild card throwing everyone off.
Maybe that would be too confusing.
So that player becomes the clue giver.
The first time a player is the clue giver,
they take 1 red token from the set up card.
Then the clue giver provides their clue by
using the numbered tokens.
The #1 token is placed in front of the R,
#2 in front of the A, and #3 in front of the W.
Since I’m this player and don’t know
my letter, I have no idea what the #2 token represents.
If the wild card is used to create the word,
the clue giver doesn’t say the letter, but
instead places a number token near it just
like the other letters.
If a player has a number token in front of
their letter, they can try to figure out their
letter by using their guessing sheet.
But be mindful other players shouldn’t be able
to see your paper.
So you write each letter you know.
Right now I know #1 is R and #3 is W. I don’t
know #2.
So R, don’t know, amd a W. So I can write R?W.
If the wild card was used, you can just write
a star to represent that letter, as shown here.
Now players try to guess their letters.
I think my letter could be an O, as in ROW.
Or an A, as in RAW.
But I’m just not confident, so I’m gonna wait.
Maybe the next round will help me more.
So I’ll just keep my cards the way they are.
But let’s say I am confident.
I replace my card with the next card in my
row without looking at the cards.
You should never look at any of your cards.
But make sure you’re pretty confident if you
move on because you can’t go back!
If a dummy player letter is used, discard
it and replace it with the next one on the stack.
Ha, it’s the same letter.
When players are all finished, they start
a new round, looking at all of the cards,
trying to think of a word clue.
Again, you should see 5 letters regardless
of the player count.
Now, maybe there are some new letters to work with.
If during a 4, 5, or 6 player game, a player
becomes the clue giver, but already has a
red token, that player takes a green token.
If the green tokens run out, you can figure
out who hasn’t given a clue yet.
That player becomes the clue giver, taking
the last red token on the set up card,
freeing up the green token in the middle.
In a 3 player game, clue givers take a red
token for the first 2 clues they give.
In a 2 player game, clue givers take a red
token for the first 3 clues they give.
You want all players to give at least 1 clue
because when the red tokens are gone, the
green token in the middle becomes available.
Meaning, players get another round to help
them guess their letters.
If a dummy player’s letters should ever
run out, the green token under the cards gets
moved to the set up card.
Now, players have another round to help them.
So, the game goes on, writing guesses and
replacing cards when you think you know the letter.
And maybe I get to the point where I think I’ve figured out all of my letters.
In this case, I pick a card from the top of
the discarded stack of cards in the middle.
Again, I don’t look at the card.
Players can use that letter to create a word clue.
And I, again, try to figure out what the letter is,
like always.
But if I do figure out the letter, the card
is placed face up in the center of the table.
Now players can use that letter as well to
create word clues, like a bonus letter.
If I don’t figure out the letter, it isn’t
placed face up in the center.
Instead, I just discard it and pick a new
card from the top of the discarded stack.
If players use the bonus letter to create
a word clue, it’s discarded.
The game is over when all of the tokens run
out, or players decide they’re all done.
Maybe everyone is pretty confident they all know their letters.
Then players look at their guessing sheet
and try to order their face down cards the
right way to spell a word.
Using the letters I think I’ve figured out,
how do I rearrange these cards to spell something?
If a player is just way too confused and has
no idea what their word could possibly be,
they have the option to use any bonus letters
or the wild card to help spell a word.
For example, if a player is pretty confident
they have the letters G, S, and N, but they’re just
not sure what the last letter could be, they can
replace that card with a bonus letter.
Maybe the letter is I.
It is placed on top of the card to represent
the letter I regardless of what the letter
card underneath shows.
Now they can try to rearrange their cards
to spell SIGN or SING.
It doesn’t matter as long as it’s a real word!
Players can also use bonus letters or the
wild card to lengthen their word.
You can earn points at the end of the game
for that, which you’ll see in a little bit.
Now players flip over their cards one at a
time, hoping they’ve managed to spell something legit.
Let’s say at the start of the game I created
a 4 letter word, SPIN, for the player to my right.
And at the end of the game, that player flips
over their cards and they’ve spelled PINS.
It doesn’t matter!
That player still managed to spell a real
word and calls it a win!
You can add up scores, but honestly that’s
up to you.
The goal is really just to have fun.
Point totals are on the back of the set up
card to see where you fall.
If your word ends up not being a real word,
you get 1 point for each letter you guessed correctly.
If the word is a real word, you multiply the length
of the word by 3.
So for example if the word is 4 letters long,
you would get 12 points.
You get 1 more point for lengthening your
word, by using bonus letters or the wild card.
And you also earn 1 point for each green token left
on the set up card.
Well, that’s it for explaining Letter Jam!
Thanks again to Czech Games Edition for sponsoring
this video.
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Bye bye!

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